Welcome, Commercial Drone Pilots!
Join our growing community today!
Sign up

Hundreds violate FAA's Drone no fly zone at Albuquerque's Balloon fiesta

ArrUnTuS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
302
Likes
122
#2
5 years? o_O

I fully agree that anyone who does not comply with the rules should be punished, but sometimes I see the penalties as disproportionate if there are no serious consequences............

I would like to know how many of those aircraft that have been detected as entering a no-fly zone are piloted by professional pilots
 

R Martin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
272
Likes
143
Location
Denton, Texas
#4
5 years? o_O

I fully agree that anyone who does not comply with the rules should be punished, but sometimes I see the penalties as disproportionate if there are no serious consequences............
At some point you need to make an example that will cause everyone to sit up and take notice. The FAA has tried "education" and the problem has slowly gotten worse. People are not smart enough to do things the easy way in this case. So you break out the big stick and you start taking swings at the terminally clueless. You don't need to make all that many examples. But it is time for the FAA to show the community that they are serious and make an example that will drive that point home.

I would like to know how many of those aircraft that have been detected as entering a no-fly zone are piloted by professional pilots
I would hazard a guess and say that most of the flights fell under the "hobbyist" community....which is probably a reason that 336 met it's end in the latest FAA Reauthorization Act.
 

ArrUnTuS

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
302
Likes
122
#7
At some point you need to make an example that will cause everyone to sit up and take notice. The FAA has tried "education" and the problem has slowly gotten worse. People are not smart enough to do things the easy way in this case. So you break out the big stick and you start taking swings at the terminally clueless. You don't need to make all that many examples. But it is time for the FAA to show the community that they are serious and make an example that will drive that point home.

I would hazard a guess and say that most of the flights fell under the "hobbyist" community....which is probably a reason that 336 met it's end in the latest FAA Reauthorization Act.
We're talking about years in jail. I don't know, but if you compare the sentences with other much more serious crimes, it's almost better for you to do much worse things. It doesn't make sense.

Another thing is that this bad action has serious consequences, then the one who does it pays, no doubt.
 

BigAl07

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
1,309
Likes
739
Age
48
Location
Western North Carolina
#8
Key thing to understand is it's UP TO 5 years. It could be days, weeks, months, or years or it could be Community Service, loss of all future sUAS rights etc.

I would like to know how many of those aircraft that have been detected as entering a no-fly zone are piloted by professional pilots
I would imagine that's a moot point because if it's a TFR, that goes for hobby or commercial operations period. The only thing that matters is Authorized/Approved flights vs all the others.
 

Earnest Ward

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2018
Messages
61
Likes
22
Age
67
#9
Aerial Armor has a vested interest in promoting the potential "threat component" of droning. And the media thrives on sensational headlines. It will be far more interesting (for the droning community) to see the follow-up report (the one that gives us the precise number of NFZ violations, and the actions taken by local and federal authorities - including the FAA.) I'd also be interested to know if DJI's Aeroscope system reads the serial numbers of ALL drones in the area, or just those manufactured by DJI.

Despite a plethora of courses & webinars, apps, online aids, et al, there still seems to be a significant problem with remote pilots who are either ignorant of the laws and regulations - or who simply choose to disregard same. Perhaps it's time to implement point-of-purchase registration (Yea, I hear the lobbyists howling over that one.), a passive ID/tracking system, and either a Sport or Private license for hobbyists, while retaining the Commercial ticket for professionals. And, sooner or later, we are bound to see the FAA shift from Education mode to Enforcement. (Realistically, without the shift I can't imagine the commercial drone community ever being thoroughly integrated into the NAS.)
 
Likes: R Martin

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
1,557
Messages
14,431
Members
2,599
Latest member
deere200