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Second mission for DroneBase.com

Build your experience flying your drone on your own time. You may think your doing yourself a favor working for these bottom feeders, but you aren't. What you are doing is screwing the entire industry. You said it yourself, couldn't live on what you would make taking these type of jobs. So why do it?
Well, now you've got me thinking. I hadn't looked at it from that angle before. I'll grant you that if I'm the guy who goes around charging $80 for a complete roof daylight + thermography mission, yeah, that's bottom feeding and bad for the industry. On the other hand, just because DB pays me low rates doesn't mean they're charging the customer low rates. I have no idea what DB gets paid per mission, though it wouldn't surprise me if they're on the lower end just by virtue of the fact that their pilots are drawn from a pool of probably newer drone pilots like me who aren't necessarily that good at what they do (yet). So lower on both the prices and the quality. I don't think that's necessarily screwing the entire industry, especially since they can't price themselves too low, because they've got all the overhead of running a large scale operation, maintaining their cloud services, manning a support desk for the pilots, etc.

Meanwhile, I'm benefiting from the customers they find, and the experience I get working to someone else's spec, which is hard to simulate when flying self-assigned missions. I do, of course, practice flying my drone on my own time (heck, it's fun!), so that's neither a plus nor a minus since I'll keep on flying whether I'm taking DB missions or not. Also, as a part-time pilot with a full time day job, it's nice to be able to turn jobs down without worrying about getting a reputation for being unreliable. So for me there are what seem to be tangible benefits to taking DB missions for the time being, and it doesn't seem to me that it's terrible for the industry.

But then again, I don't know what I don't know, so I'll be glad to get your feedback on all this. I'll be happy to reconsider if there's something I don't know about, like if DB is charging really bottom-feeder prices to the end customers or something. And thanks for making me think about this--this is an important consideration I hadn't given much thought to before.
 
I used my first drone to do roof inspections because I was doing home and commercial property inspection. I decided to try real estate because of the contacts I already had with multiple realtors. That's when I learned the difference between guys like me and professional photographers, and there is a major difference. Realtors want the whole package, interior, exterior, day, evening shoots and they expects the photos to be professional grade.
One of the ranches close by went up for sale a couple of years ago. The photographer hired me to map forty acres of the property, that guy edited everyone of the mapping photos before I sent them off to Drone Deploy.
He also charged the client $3500.00 for his work. The results were breathtaking.
If you want to just shoot exteriors for the banks, lenders, insurance companies start knocking on doors. Talk to your local banks, and insurance companies and I bet you'll find some decent paying work.
Unless you are a seasoned professional photographer you aren't going to make any money dealing with realtors, they are the cheapest people in the world.

I know my previous comment probably sounded a little harsh, and it was. So I will apologize to anyone I offended. I know there are people out there trying to make a living doing aerial photography and I would just like to see a level playing field for them. I'm on the down hill side of life so my gigs are to keep out of my wife's hair time. I don't need the money, but I won't work cheap.
 
I used my first drone to do roof inspections because I was doing home and commercial property inspection. I decided to try real estate because of the contacts I already had with multiple realtors. That's when I learned the difference between guys like me and professional photographers, and there is a major difference. Realtors want the whole package, interior, exterior, day, evening shoots and they expects the photos to be professional grade.
One of the ranches close by went up for sale a couple of years ago. The photographer hired me to map forty acres of the property, that guy edited everyone of the mapping photos before I sent them off to Drone Deploy.
He also charged the client $3500.00 for his work. The results were breathtaking.
If you want to just shoot exteriors for the banks, lenders, insurance companies start knocking on doors. Talk to your local banks, and insurance companies and I bet you'll find some decent paying work.
Unless you are a seasoned professional photographer you aren't going to make any money dealing with realtors, they are the cheapest people in the world.

I know my previous comment probably sounded a little harsh, and it was. So I will apologize to anyone I offended. I know there are people out there trying to make a living doing aerial photography and I would just like to see a level playing field for them. I'm on the down hill side of life so my gigs are to keep out of my wife's hair time. I don't need the money, but I won't work cheap.
Hi , I am interested in finding work, (as you mentioned in your response above), with banks, lenders and Insurance Companies. I am pretty new to the industry and have been focused on Real Estate Photography. I do need to secure more work in order to do this full time. Any suggestions on how I should go about finding companies that would hire a drone operator to do the types of shots you are referencing above? Thanks in advance!
 
Many times the property management companis, banks, and insurance companies want photos of properites they are handling and the drone is the perfect tool for the job. Most are only looking for exterior photos and as you know the drone will give you that advantage of shooting the rear of the property without tresspassing. I have only done one of job like that, I photographed two properties in the same location for $300.00. What I didn't realize was they were is really bad neighborhoods so if you are going to look into that aspect of work, be careful of where your jobs may send you, and don't be afraid to decline if you don't feel good about the job.

Also Contruction documentation is very profitable, and it seems the bigger companies are the ones most interested in having that kind of documentation.

Also if your in a farming area, get aquainted with some of the farmers and learn a bit about doing crop health reports.

One of the things I'm seeing is a lot of companies are going in house and having their own people trained.

Best of luck to you.
 
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I've been taking a few Bees360 jobs to get familiar with what is requested of claims inspections (mostly roofs). Is fairly easy, but they don't pay top dollar. I am checking locations every time a job comes up and if it seems like it will take much time I message the contact and let them know, and every time they have bumped up pay. Very far from home, bump in pay, detached garage, bumped up pay, large house/complex roof-bump in pay. Makes me think that they are willing to pay more but just offer bottom dollar unless you ask. That being said, I couldn't see trying to make a living of this at these prices. (starts at $75). Covering insurance, travel, wear and tear, etc not to mention time and expertise is worth more.
I've made many bids on droners.io for somewhat local jobs, but they always seem to be swooped up by bottom dollar folks. that's fine by me, but it would be nice to see pay commensurate with the skills required. dronebase (zeitview) hasn't shown me a single job in the past month, so I wonder if they really have much presence in my area.
 
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Another reason I don't mess with real estate, and the fact in most cases there is no money in it.
When I tried doing it, it was a very local job so I didn’t think about expenses. But I made the mistake of not really thinking about all I was putting into it and it wouldn’t have been a sustainable business had I continued doing it.

I was going to ask him if it at least paid for his gas.
 
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Build your experience flying your drone on your own time. You may think your doing yourself a favor working for these bottom feeders, but you aren't. What you are doing is screwing the entire industry. You said it yourself, couldn't live on what you would make taking these type of jobs. So why do it?
Well said. Bottom feeders indeed. Think about it, $10k plus in equipment, 20+ years creative skills, education, licensing, insurance, project planning, photography/videography skill development, continued training and practice......and someone is willing to do 3 hours of work (including travel time) for $50 to $100. Freaking stupid.
 
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Well said. Bottom feeders indeed. Think about it, $10k plus in equipment, 20+ years creative skills, education, licensing, insurance, project planning, photography/videography skill development, continued training and practice......and someone is willing to do 3 hours of work (including travel time) for $50 to $100. Freaking stupid.
Dronebase jobs require very little skill, so no doubt that’s why they don’t pay much.
 
Maybe not a LOT of skill. but enough to fly thermal and mapping missions, which requires equipment that isn't cheap. I'd like to see the locals that are swiping up a 23 acre thermal, inspection and mapping mission requiring a minimum of 8 hours of flight time (batteries!) for $450. not this chump.
 
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Good point. However, not profitable regardless of what level you are at, but good for experience.
Well, if you’re just trying to learn you’re not really worried about profit I have earned about $5000 a year on Dronebase for the past two years but for me it’s just more of a hobby.
At least I paid for all my drone equipment
 
Well, if you’re just trying to learn you’re not really worried about profit I have earned about $5000 a year on Dronebase for the past two years but for me it’s just more of a hobby.
At least I paid for all my drone equipment
Absolutely. I am not knocking those that fly the missions....someone has to. The unfortunate result is that rates are not driven by costs. So there is a lot of work out there that is not profitable for anyone other than the customer. I have flown my share of "equipment fund" flights. I think what is frustrating is that we know at a minimum what it takes to do work in this industry correctly and that is not accepted by most businesses at this time. Flying is a part, and sometimes a very small part, of what we do.

Heck, none of it probably matters as AI will handle everything for us in a few years right?
 
Absolutely. I am not knocking those that fly the missions....someone has to. The unfortunate result is that rates are not driven by costs. So there is a lot of work out there that is not profitable for anyone other than the customer. I have flown my share of "equipment fund" flights. I think what is frustrating is that we know at a minimum what it takes to do work in this industry correctly and that is not accepted by most businesses at this time. Flying is a part, and sometimes a very small part, of what we do.

Heck, none of it probably matters as AI will handle everything for us in a few years right?
I just think it’s wrong to call them bottom feeders they’re just taking what work they can.
 
I just think it’s wrong to call them bottom feeders they’re just taking what work they can.
The post that utilized bottom feeders was from another member and referred to the companies, not the pilots taking the jobs. My quote of that and Bottom Feeders were agreeing with the post on the companies. Now, I do believe that consistently supporting these companies by doing work at an unreasonably low rate for the work done is a bad idea. You only see rates drop further and further. Look what Fiverr did to the creative industry. That is what these firms are doing for UAS work. Just my perspective and sorry if it ruffled feathers.
 
The post that utilized bottom feeders was from another member and referred to the companies, not the pilots taking the jobs. My quote of that and Bottom Feeders were agreeing with the post on the companies. Now, I do believe that consistently supporting these companies by doing work at an unreasonably low rate for the work done is a bad idea. You only see rates drop further and further. Look what Fiverr did to the creative industry. That is what these firms are doing for UAS work. Just my perspective and sorry if it ruffled feathers.
I didn't mean you per-se. It's already too late - tons of nubes out there willing to do these missions.
Me, I made my vig I am done, and the worst part is now I don't even fly for fun any more, because now it feeling like a chore.
I make too much in my day job to start a business, so that's it.
 
I think the people that take these jobs have a dream of getting paid for doing something they really like. I get it. I also bought a metal detector that cost more than my drone to go get rich by finding gold with it. I am beginning to think it was the guy that sold it to me that was the one who found it.
 
Does anybody here own a DLSR Camera or even use a cell phone? all you need is a mono pole and Wal La 10' pictures at less risk
 
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Does anybody here own a DLSR Camera or even use a cell phone? all you need is a mono pole and Wal La 10' pictures at less risk
I do pole photography, I have several versions, including a 20-foot telescoping one it is actually designed as a flagpole sold at Amazon and harbor freight that I put my DSLR on. I was able to get “aerial” images at Joshua Tree National Park looking down at climbers and flowering Joshua trees. A Ranger stopped by because he saw the camera flying around in the air and thought it was a drone, but then he realized what it was, and was interested.

I also use a pole instead of the drone to do high resolution 3-D models of bedrock mortars and milling sites for my wife’s archaeological company. We also use telescopic painter’s poles with adapters that turn the standard screw head on the pole into a camera mount:

ProPole - Painter's Pole Adapter - Made in The USA - Camera Monopod, Selfie Stick, Extension Pole, Telescoping Pole Amazon.com

Pole photography is a great alternative to using a drone.
 
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