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Mavic 2 Pro Camera

Fred Garvin

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This little camera never ceases to amaze me. I was going through some shots of a commercial building I did in Arlington last month, and I noticed up on the horizon I could see AT&T Stadium and Six Flags, even downtown Fort Worth way off in the distance. So I cropped it, and I mean an EXTREME crop, like "maybe" 2% of the image, and blew it up. This is what that little camera captured from probably 3 miles away. I know it's not the best image, but considering the source data I pulled it from.....

Arlington Entertainment District.jpg
 

Florida Drone Supply

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The P4 and the Mavic 2 have a pretty high pedestal to stand on. I am so glad they decided to keep using the same battery in the P4 Multispectral and P4P RTK with no plan to retire soon. so we can keep getting batteries and parts for our P4P line.

Mike D
 

Fred Garvin

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I haven't used the P4P, just the Mavics and Inspires. I also used Typhoons; the 480 with CGO3 and H+ with the C23. The C23 has a 1" sensor so is in line with the L1D-20c.
Use the right one for the job.

^^This^^ "Better" is too subjective. You could easily argue a Hasselblad H6d-400c is a superior camera to a Nikon D500...but try using the Hassy to shoot a football game...or the D500 for magazine fashion shoots....
 

R.Perry

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Well Fred as was with me, I guess most woundn't know what a Hasselbald H6d was, and there is a few dollars difference between any of the Nikon D series and that camera. At forty seven thousand dollars I just don't think it is one of my options.

Let me ask you, if someone shot a photo with the D750 and the Hasselbald the same photo could you tell the difference in say a 8x11 photo? I'm not a professional like yourself, but how do you justify 47 grand for a camera?
 

Meta4

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Let me ask you, if someone shot a photo with the D750 and the Hasselbald the same photo could you tell the difference in say a 8x11 photo?
Probably not ..... but no-one buys an H6D to make 8x11 prints
 
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Fred Garvin

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Maybe. It would depend on the skill of the Photographer. In the hands of a very skilled Professional Photographer, just about any camera can be used to produce a great image. My comparison was more to the point of using the proper tool for the job.

Medium Format cameras with ultra-high MP counts aren't for creating billboard size images. These cameras are used in very, very high-end portraiture. Top tier fashion models, magazine layouts, A-List Hollywood celebrity portfolios. These photographers get paid $50k to $75k + per shoot.

They're also used by very sought-after Professional Photographers for fine family portraiture. In a wealthy person's home, you see these massive 36x48 portraits or 48x72 family portraits that are stunning, with huge frames and elaborate mountings. These cost $15k to $20k in addition to the photographer's fee of $7500 to $10k.

You'll also see them used in landscape photography, for example, the images you see in Better Homes & Gardens, or Southern Living, Architectural Digest, etc. These are very expensive shoots that take days, if not a week, to get done. There's a team of professionals: Lighting Technicians, Landscapers, Decorators, Makeup Artists, Hairdressers, Project Managers, Set Managers, Post Processing Teams, Catering....really big productions. These shoots can easily top $100k.

That's where you justify a $47k camera. BTW....that doesn't include the lenses! That's just the camera and Digital Back.
 

R.Perry

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Thanks Fred, I did get the fact that you were talking about the right tool for the job. Also, thanks for the lesson about professional photography and photographers.
I don't know if you know who Joel Sartore is, he is or was a National Geo photographer that has produced several courses on photography. I have taken his courses and learned a great deal, but there is so much to learn.
How does someone step up to the professional level, I have no desire to, but just wondering.
 

Fred Garvin

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It's simple really, just get someone to pay you to take pictures. And come back again.

IMHO, a "Professional Photographer" has a complete understanding of exposure. I don't mean getting a "properly" exposed image, that's a given of course. I mean knowing how to use Depth of Field, Shutter Speed and other factors to produce a specific image that you want, to convey an idea, feeling, emotion, setting, etc. You should know the standard tehcniques for creating a specified image.

You should have an extensive knowledge of lighting. In the studio, if I say: " Give me 70 on the key, 20 on the fills and an orange gell on the snoot. Then back the key and bump the fills for a few Rembrandts." You should know how to use a light meter and where/how to place the lighting to achieve these recipies.

You should have a deep depth of pose, the classical poses, modern modeling and arrangement. Even if you specialize, you should still have a working knowledge of Portraiture, Landscape, Sports, Modeling, Commercial, Product, Photojournalism, Weddings, etc. You should be able to functionally assist any photographer in any given situation, at a level where your "2nd Shooter" images are marketable.

You should be completely comfortable working in a studio. If I say: "Roll out a 7' mottled seamless and a 6" Apple"...I expect it to be ready. "We're gonna shoot straight to Photoshop"...you need to have that setup and working. A functional working knowledge of Photoshop and Lightroom is expected. You don't need to be an expert, we hire those for that type of shoot.

You need to know your camera. And I mean KNOW your camera. Every button, dial, switch and setting. Why you use them and why you wouldn't use them. Have your camera properly setup at EVERY shoot. Know how to setup your camera for a shoot and what lens you will use and why. (why is it better to use an 85mm rather than a 28mm for Portraiture? Why is a 105mm even better? What is the advantage using a 200mm zoomed in tight rather than set at 70mm and being closer?) And please don't show up with less than a full frame. (although, a D500 with a 500mm lens is an incredible wildlife rig)

There are many, many things and I've only scratched the surface. If you set your camera to "M" and leave it there, you're probably on your way. (If you can sell those images)
 
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R.Perry

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Thanks Fred, outstanding explanation of professional verses us hobbyists. It is interesting how each profession develops it's own slang.
 
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DVA

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The M2P camera is great, but the P4P camera's advantage is the mechanical shutter
 

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