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Part 107 Logbook Question

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#1
Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I have to refresh my memory on all of the Part 107 rules as I'm due to take the recurrent test soon. Are drone pilots required to keep a log book? Flight records in the DJI app aren't good enough?
 

BigAl07

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#3
Well said @LUIS MARTINEZ

It's a great idea to log your hours and your maintenance records.

If there should be an incident of any kind you'll be well advised to have both available for review.

We have to carry our flight logs with us anytime we're dispatched for "State Emergency Services" and the Incident Commander will ask to review them when arriving on scene.
 

R.Perry

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#4
If the FAA ever gets around to performance evaluations for a bi annual then having an accurate log book could be a very good thing. I log all my flight time, note preflight inspections and maintenance inspections. I also document any failures or problems I may encounter.

But as stated, it is not required, just a very good practice.
 
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#6
I've found paying for a subscription to airdata.com extremely helpful in tracking flights, details, maintenance reminders, etc. Not sure if it can really be considered a logbook, but I refer to it frequently to get details of my flights that I can't get from DJI directly.

LP
 
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Johnny C!

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#7
I was intending to document my flights in a hard
copy logbook, like I do for my full size aircraft, but
when I found the highly detailed electronic log in
my DJI app, I have not started with the hard copy
yet.
 

BigAl07

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#8
I was intending to document my flights in a hard
copy logbook, like I do for my full size aircraft, but
when I found the highly detailed electronic log in
my DJI app, I have not started with the hard copy
yet.
Does the DJI App allow you the ability to backup and print them? You'll want to keep a backup just in case the e-copy goes bye bye.
 
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embayweather

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#10
I keep a log of every flight, maintenance, repair, replacement, weather, NOTAMs etc through Kittyhawk . Perhaps not need here in the U.K. but it will be I am sure. Not just good record keeping should there be an incident, but also helps you keep an eye on your aircraft performance too. Do it, but. It hard copy.
 

R Martin

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#11
Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I have to refresh my memory on all of the Part 107 rules as I'm due to take the recurrent test soon. Are drone pilots required to keep a log book? Flight records in the DJI app aren't good enough?
The only dumb question is the one you didn't know and didn't ask. As answered above, you are not currently required to keep any records but the FAA can perform a field inspection of your operation and request those papers that you are not required to keep. So keep records of everything, especially maintenance records.
 
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Dave Pitman

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#12
So keep records of everything, especially maintenance records.
I'm curious to what extent others are keeping maintenance records. I know what I am keeping. But, since "we" are kind of making this up ourselves at this point, I'd be interested in what I may be missing if anything. Mostly I just physically inspect and pay close attention to note if batteries are trying to tell me something, quirks in performance, anything like that. Visible defects are a no-brainer.

There really is no manufacture specified or recommended parts replacement schedule for DJI craft. I know some guys replace certain parts after a certain period. I for one, don't just replace parts after a guesstimated time interval. Without certifiable fatigue testing and superior quality insurances in manufacturing, it's possible to remove and "old" perfectly good part and replace it with a "new" part with an unseen manufacturing defect. It's too much like gambling.

Anyway, if anyone wants to suss this out further, that would be great.
 

BigAl07

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#13
I note weekly visual inspections of aircraft and batteries, any components changes (props, LED, etc) and also do monthly battery logging. This battery logging I note # of charge cycles, battery health, and when/if it's time to do a Deep Cycle on the batteries. Like Dave I'm trying to see what the battery is "telling me" before something actually goes critical. We're looking for patterns that coule indicate a pending failure.

Of course if I have a mishap that requires repairs that goes into the logs as well.

I keep flight logs per aircraft and usually print them out monthly for the last 12 months only.
 
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R Martin

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#14
I record battery data per charge (pre-charge amperage, post-charge amperage, preflight amperage, ect... as well as voltage per cell, charge time, total resistance). I attached my day before flight checklist (7 more hoops to jump through after this one.)
For maintenance I include each preflight, any component retirement due to damage or service life, our annual maintenance check in the shop, and unique replacements. Software upgrades, hardware upgrades, firmware upgrades, app updates, ad nauseum....

Honestly, the battery data is the most useful for me. You can see the battery degrade over time andthe recycle it. If that doesn't improve the performance then once I get down to about 80% of capacity as far as total available power then it gets retired. 12-14 minutes of available power for most of my work will require at least two batteries to do the job (and a hot swap for an extra 3-5 minutes which just goes against my grain).
 

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R.Perry

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#15
Since I'm flying at a construction site the I2 gets pretty dusty so I do a weekly cleaning and use low air pressure to blow out the motors and the landing gears.
I also do a close prop inspection before each days flights. On the I2 the props become lose in the hubs after a while, when they do I replace them. I always check the motors for smooth movement. I clean the battery contacts at least once a month.
As noted above, battery survey each month, number of charges, cell voltages, and battery temp after flights.
I may be a little over the top but the site where I work has a lot of people and I want to do all I can to make sure I have a safe aircraft.
 
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Dave Pitman

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#16
My pre-flight includes visual inspection of the battery and compartment and checking cell voltages, deviation between cells, and stated mAhs.

I do not regularly do DJI's "deep discharge" routine as some of you do. That procedure is not helpful to the lipo itself. It is designed, as I'm sure you guys know, to calibrate the "smart chip". DJI rep ED (Tahoe Ed on RCG) recommended long ago it is not necessary if the indicated fully charged mAhs is within 5% of stated capacity. So far, in all of the craft that I have owned, I have never seen a deviation that great. I don't know if I'm just lucky or it's because I follow good general lipo heath procedures pretty strictly. DJI has since removed the recommendation to do deep discharges on craft newer than the Phantom 4 (regular). As is their policy, they don't say why they made the change but I can guess it was doing more harm than good in some cases.

I'm not advocating folks change what's working for them. Just sharing whats been working for me.

I mostly use a props-on cases for my Phantoms and I believe that not constantly taking off and putting on props is probably less stressful for the props and clips that way. It may not be an option for some.
 
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