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Drone with camera found on Fort Worth,Texas Military Base runway

BigAl07

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For anyone asking, "Why are we so heavily regulated and why is the FAA wanting to increase our rules and regulations".... This is your answer:


Drone with camera found on Fort Worth,Texas Military Base runway

I would love to see the person responsible for this identified, located, and prosecuted heavily. There is ZERO excuse for this happening.
 

Mike Flys

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For anyone asking, "Why are we so heavily regulated and why is the FAA wanting to increase our rules and regulations".... This is your answer:


Drone with camera found on Fort Worth,Texas Military Base runway

I would love to see the person responsible for this identified, located, and prosecuted heavily. There is ZERO excuse for this happening.

If it's a DJI drone they will be able to trace it to whoever bought and or registered it. The one that was hit by a Seahawk Helicopter in New England (New York or New jersey I forget) was traced back to the owner via a serial number on the motor one of the very few pieces recovered.

Mike
 

BigAl07

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If it's a DJI drone they will be able to trace it to whoever bought and or registered it. The one that was hit by a Seahawk Helicopter in New England (New York or New jersey I forget) was traced back to the owner via a serial number on the motor one of the very few pieces recovered.

Mike
It's not DJI unfortunately.

"Promark Drone P70-CW with a built-in WiFi signal, battery-powered, automatic takeoff and landing, and the ability to the ability to stream, record and photograph live footage to smartphones."
 
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ArrUnTuS

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Do not think that you are very regulated because it is not so, and I do not know the US regulations very well. To be sure that things are going to get worse, because irresponsible as in this case there are lots of people, who in most cases are not professionals, they are amateurs. Of course, the new regulations that will make you ask permission to pee will be charged to the professionals.

So far with manned aircraft there have been only a few minor accidents and many incidents. A few days ago, the news of how a drone saved the lives of two teenagers has spread around the world. The day that someone unfortunately dies from a drone is going to be known worldwide with the same speed and that will undoubtedly bring about an immediate tightening of the regulations. It's not a matter of whether it's going to happen, it's a matter of when :(
 

Rodger

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If it's a DJI drone they will be able to trace it to whoever bought and or registered it. The one that was hit by a Seahawk Helicopter in New England (New York or New jersey I forget) was traced back to the owner via a serial number on the motor one of the very few pieces recovered.

Mike

It was New York Mike and the Blackhawk was part of Presidential Security. It is an interesting read as to how it all came together. DJI did a great job.
 
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Rodger

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Most Military Bases are in a NFZ let alone flying one on their Airstrip. Again, the irresponsible at play and unfortunately, we the the hit.
 

Paul Irish

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If 3dr can figure out geo-fencing to keep the drone confined inside an area, then there should be not problem with creating the opposite. I am suggesting a geo-fence that doesn't allow a drone to fly within its limits or a no fly bubble.

They (drones) all use satellites for their positioning which can be government or FAA regulated, it's just computer code.
They could require drone makers to have code built in that has to pass a check of code which could prevent flight in restricted areas.

I know that drones can fly without the satellites, but to do that the person would need to be close to or in the area. If it is a military base or an airport, security should be able to detect that person before they have a chance to do something harmful

Just a thought!!!
 

Dave Pitman

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Anyone wanting manufacturer imposed geo-fencing can use dji or yuneec, to name a couple right now. I, and many other certified operators don't have a problem with that approach. But we have a problem when the manufacturer has no mechanism for certified operators to "opt out" of their geo-fencing scheme.

Yuneec has this mechanism. Dji is unwilling and instead requires even certified users to repeatedly ask them for an unlock mechanism which has failed many times in the field. The first time you are on a job and something goes wrong with the manufacturer's geo-fencing software when you otherwise have everything in order will give you a renewed perspective. Especially if your client happens to be pressent. I have even been asked by knowledgeable clients if I use any dji gear that is subject to dji's geofencing because they have had uas contractors have problems with it in the past. These are municipality and Port Authority type clients that are hiring you to work at airports or industrial complexes next to airports.

In the US, the FAA is moving in the direction of some sort of live broadcast ID for all sUAVs. They are not moving in the direction of mandated manufacturer geo-fencing.

Yes, this is a bit of a sore spot for me. I am all for enforcing the rules. I am not at all for manufacturers making up their own rules and forcing them on gov't certified ops.

Edited for spelling
 
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ArrUnTuS

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Pilots have to be responsible for what their aircraft do. I am totally opposed to hardware limitations. We start with things like that and then there's nothing but trouble. Today, at least in my country, you can fly in any airspace, day or night, but to do so you have to comply with a rigorous set of rules and apply for a lot of permits. Even if it is a long process, it is preferable to hardware blockages or restrictions. We are talking about professional pilots which is what this forum is oriented to.
 

Chris Spence

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Anyone consider this could have been a flyaway of a cheap [Language Removed] drone. SMH!!
 
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ArrUnTuS

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Anyone consider this could have been a flyaway of a cheap .... drone. SMH!!

You're right, it's a very serious possibility. The first one I had I lost it to the 30 seconds of flight and it appeared 3 km further..........
 
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BigAl07

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Anyone consider this could have been a flyaway of a cheap [Language Removed] drone. SMH!!

Uh post #3 above stated exactly what it was. But for kicks and grins I'll restate it:

"Promark Drone P70-CW with a built-in WiFi signal, battery-powered, automatic takeoff and landing, and the ability to the ability to stream, record and photograph live footage to smartphones."

$99 toy drone from Walmart with a 576p camera !!
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Promark-Warrior-Drone-P70-CW-Drone/133991225
 
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As an airline pilot, and a drone operator, I am for geofencing, but their must be a simpler way to override it. I don't mind the DJI approach to things, meaning you send them your authorization/approval, and they unlock the geofencing for that area, for the duration involved. The problem with DJI's is that it fails to unlock many times, which is ridiculous, so there should be another way.

The reason I am for the geofencing is not because of commercial operators, but rather the countless idiots, uneducated, or outright reckless drone operators out there. There rarely is a week that goes by that doesn't have at least one drone "sighting" by an airplane pilot. As a pilot flying an aircraft with as much as 331 people on board, the last thing I need is some drone colliding in a manner that takes my pilot skills out of the equation (yes, it can happen, even though highly unlikely). Ever seen a LiPo battery on fire? Do you know what is inside those airliner wings? Taking out an engine is not a problem, but embedding a damaged LiPo battery (likes to catch fire) into a part of the aircraft near its fuel is another matter altogether.

If ALL drone operators of the world were professional, and flew according to the rules and safety guidelines, then geofencing would not be required. Problem is that we don't live in that world.
 

BigAl07

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As an airline pilot, and a drone operator, I am for geofencing, but their must be a simpler way to override it. I don't mind the DJI approach to things, meaning you send them your authorization/approval, and they unlock the geofencing for that area, for the duration involved. The problem with DJI's is that it fails to unlock many times, which is ridiculous, so there should be another way.

The reason I am for the geofencing is not because of commercial operators, but rather the countless idiots, uneducated, or outright reckless drone operators out there. There rarely is a week that goes by that doesn't have at least one drone "sighting" by an airplane pilot. As a pilot flying an aircraft with as much as 331 people on board, the last thing I need is some drone colliding in a manner that takes my pilot skills out of the equation (yes, it can happen, even though highly unlikely). Ever seen a LiPo battery on fire? Do you know what is inside those airliner wings? Taking out an engine is not a problem, but embedding a damaged LiPo battery (likes to catch fire) into a part of the aircraft near its fuel is another matter altogether.

If ALL drone operators of the world were professional, and flew according to the rules and safety guidelines, then geofencing would not be required. Problem is that we don't live in that world.

I Agree 1,000,000,000%. You've hit the virtual nail on the virtual head my friend.
 

RNCotton

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Residences literally right against the NAS. $99 toy. Some kid was flying in his back yard, or at the park next to the NAS, and lost it. How do you regulate that?

Geofencing is great, but this little toy doesn't have GPS and programming like that.
 

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