Welcome, Commercial Drone Pilots!
Join our growing community today!
Sign up

DJI Spark for Indoor Incident Resolution for SWAT

shooter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
109
Reaction score
48
Age
68
Location
Northern New Mexico, USA
Website
www.lanl.gov
Hi,

We're in the process of folding use of the DJI Spark into indoor incident resolution policies and procedures for SWAT operations.

Has any other agency done something similar? If so, I'd like to discuss either here or via direct email -- secured via the Entrust encryption service, if needed.

Thanks!

Shooter
 

PCTyphoon

New Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Age
52
Location
Liberty, SC
We have the Typhoon H which has IPS but I have not tried flying down hallways yet. The Spark is perfect for that. Keep us updated.
 

shooter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
109
Reaction score
48
Age
68
Location
Northern New Mexico, USA
Website
www.lanl.gov
We have the Typhoon H which has IPS but I have not tried flying down hallways yet. The Spark is perfect for that. Keep us updated.
The Typhoon is pretty big for indoors. I started with the DJI inspire as a "proof of concept" but that was way too big as well. The Mavic was better, but the Spark (at this point) seems to have hit the sweet spot, even with the altitude restriction as we fly it just with the phone.
 

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
DSAR Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
1,312
Age
48
Location
Western North Carolina
Thanks for the info. Nice platform...but, we wanted something that was easier to learn to fly and would be more forgiving to most new guys. The Spark seems to fit the bill. But, hey, I have an open mind.
I fully understand where you're coming from but we teach just the opposite. We earn on the harder ones and then if budget and mission affords we move up to "easier" ones. Keep in mind if the aircraft loses GPS etc inside you need to know how to fly the bird and in tight areas (the turbulence is brutal) this can be a handful.

We have used the Blade Glimpse as a disposable sUAS with good results. You don't have a lot of range but in these situations range isn't usually an issue. If someone swats it down we're only out $100 or so and it broadcasts a WiFi video feed we can all view on our phones.
 

shooter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
109
Reaction score
48
Age
68
Location
Northern New Mexico, USA
Website
www.lanl.gov
I fully understand where you're coming from but we teach just the opposite. We earn on the harder ones and then if budget and mission affords we move up to "easier" ones. Keep in mind if the aircraft loses GPS etc inside you need to know how to fly the bird and in tight areas (the turbulence is brutal) this can be a handful.

We have used the Blade Glimpse as a disposable sUAS with good results. You don't have a lot of range but in these situations range isn't usually an issue. If someone swats it down we're only out $100 or so and it broadcasts a WiFi video feed we can all view on our phones.
Thanks, I'll have to check that out. Might be a good training platform.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
23
Reaction score
16
Location
Minnesota
Website
www.youtube.com
Yep, my first thought was a tiny whoop, the props are covered and will allow you to bump into things, even fly through small narrow gaps such as a partially closed door. Could even tap the video feed with a large monitor on the outside.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shooter and BigAl07

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
DSAR Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
1,312
Age
48
Location
Western North Carolina
Yep, my first thought was a tiny whoop, the props are covered and will allow you to bump into things, even fly through small narrow gaps such as a partially closed door. Could even tap the video feed with a large monitor on the outside.
We've flown these things in some crazy scenarios for sure. Flown through a partially open window one time for a simulated hostage situation. Gave the IC a great situational awareness with minimal expense on the line.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shooter

IrishmanPDX

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
20
Reaction score
21
Location
Portland Oregon
I've always supported learning on the hardest drones to fly (and they are usually quite cheap). The reason being is it teaches you how to deal with turbulence indoors, no aides in handling so you need to fly manual and get the feel of the drone. Then you can move up the line to something with more automated features but still take over control should you have to (and by that stage you should have mastered flying manual indoors).
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
23
Reaction score
16
Location
Minnesota
Website
www.youtube.com
I've always supported learning on the hardest drones to fly (and they are usually quite cheap). The reason being is it teaches you how to deal with turbulence indoors, no aides in handling so you need to fly manual and get the feel of the drone. Then you can move up the line to something with more automated features but still take over control should you have to (and by that stage you should have mastered flying manual indoors).
I am a big fan of that as well, especially learning manual flying in acro etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: IrishmanPDX

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
DSAR Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
1,312
Age
48
Location
Western North Carolina
One reason why we insist on learning on the "hard ones" is because technology fails and when it does it will be at the worst possible moment. If you've never flown in manual/atti mode and it happens unexpectedly it will take time and effort which you probably won't have the luxury of.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Helihover

shooter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
109
Reaction score
48
Age
68
Location
Northern New Mexico, USA
Website
www.lanl.gov
One reason why we insist on learning on the "hard ones" is because technology fails and when it does it will be at the worst possible moment. If you've never flown in manual/atti mode and it happens unexpectedly it will take time and effort which you probably won't have the luxury of.
Completely understand, and that's how I started off. I'm trying to find the balance between getting these guys stick time and the skill needed in case of system crapout.

I've always maintained that the real mettle and skill of a pilot is really tested when things go wrong...not when everything is working as designed.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BigAl07

BigAl07

Administrator
Staff member
DSAR Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
1,312
Age
48
Location
Western North Carolina
Completely understand, and that's how I started off. I'm trying to find the balance between getting these guys stick time and the skill needed in case of system crapout.

I've always maintained that the real mettle and skill of a pilot is really tested when things go wrong...not when everything is working as designed.

We train LEO to fly UAS and let me tell you we put them through the ringer. They experience as much chaos as we can without actually slapping them in the face while they are flying LOL!
 

Okwaho

New Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
1
Reaction score
3
Age
29
ABC actually had a good piece on this, including the use of a Mavic Pro with propeller cages for indoor use. Pretty heavy expense when compared to the tiny whoops though. Indoor bit starts at 44s

 

New Threads

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
2,287
Messages
21,758
Members
3,520
Latest member
Murphnerd