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Safety Guidelines flying on the end of a Class G untowered airport

BigAl07

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It sounds like things have settled down a bit on this one. Whew :)

@BryanD while you've not made any mention of "thinking you're a Commercial Pilot" it is very common for someone holding a Part 107 to automatically jump on the "I'm now a pilot and expect full pilot privileges" bandwagon.

For the record, there are many of us holding Part 107 who have many hours as Part 61/121/135 operations and those are only the same thing "on plastic". So some of us get our feathers ruffled (I'm as guilty as anyone) when Part 107 operators climb on their high horse (which you didn't). It's the same thing with 135 operators when a Part 61 starts beating their chest and toting their knowledge and experience.

When you've spent the time, money, and sacrifices to reach a certain milestone it's common to get defensive and I''m more guilty than most.
 
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Free2Fly

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Can't even begin to say how many times I've cringed in a cockpit listening to certificated pilots in the pattern that should have known better. Radio etiquette, concise information, proper procedure...all things that we are expected as pilots to know how to provide. I have NEVER been mad at someone for saying anything on the radio that helps me be a safer pilot. But I have gotten torqued a few times over HOW it was said. Luis and Al are both dead on with their advice. Learn how, keep it short, and only use it for "in the blind" announcements at E/G airport environments. The fact that you're so vested in wanting to get it right makes me glad to have you a part of this forum.
 

LUIS MARTINEZ

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I'm not saying 107's aren't to be respected. I'm saying because folks have obtained a 107, they may think or would like to be in the same "class as "Private Pilots".
I got my PP at 17 and commercial at 23, wasn't all that difficult and certainly didn't turn me into a TopGun (although at the time I thought so) ;)

And yes they most certainly are in the same class as far as the academic material. And surely intelligent enough to understand airport traffic patterns, communication procedures, and general use of an aviation radio with some common sense. And I've shared the sky with plenty of stupid private pilots.

If you go back to the beginning you'll recall my comments were aimed at small, uncontrolled mickey mouse airfields, not O'Hare. If a PP can't handle a lil 'ol drone position blind call over the radio w/o freaking out, well....
 

AH-1G

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I remember my first solo cross country, I was extremely nervous, to say the least. Colorado Springs ATC asked me to IDENT. (I was flying out of Butts Air field Ft.Carson) What?:eek:o_O I totally forgot what that meant, I then replied my IDENT isn't working.😬
 
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R.Perry

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First of all as a pilot if I was approaching an uncontrolled airport and someone was flying a drone I would really appreciate the drone pilot announcing his position, and altitude.
If someone is going to operate close to an uncontrolled airport they should understand the normal procedures pilots will use when approaching the airport. Most pilots will announce when they start their down wind approach. That is normally done about 1000 feet AGL. Or they will announce for a straight in and give the runway heading.
The danger point is on short final and just after take off while the aircraft is below 400 feet.

Now telling a pilot not to fly over a certain area for thirty minutes isn't a good idea, that plane is burning fuel, and it isn't cheap. I can assure you most pilots would not take kindly to a drone pilot telling them not to approach the airport for thirty minutes, besides, most drone can't fly for a full thirty minutes.

My advice would be if you here an aircraft making an approach, or departing, land and wait for you to clear the area.
 

BryanD

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Good info. Thanks. What you suggested is what I would do - land and get out of the way.

Would it be a good idea to also let the pilot know that you are aware of him and clearing out of his way?
 

LUIS MARTINEZ

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Good info. Thanks. What you suggested is what I would do - land and get out of the way.

Would it be a good idea to also let the pilot know that you are aware of him and clearing out of his way?
IMHO, Less is best, just announce your position in the blind, either s/he hears you or not. Unless pilot replies to your blind call, i.e. "repeat last", then answer.
 
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Free2Fly

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My advice would be if you here an aircraft making an approach, or departing, land and wait for you to clear the area.
This is not only great advice from Mr. Perry, it's the law.
14 CFR 107.37:
(a) Each small unmanned aircraft must yield the right of way to all aircraft, airborne vehicles, and launch and reentry vehicles. Yielding the right of way means that the small unmanned aircraft must give way to the aircraft or vehicle and may not pass over, under, or ahead of it unless well clear.
(b) No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft so close to another aircraft as to create a collision hazard.

I teach my students that "well clear" means staying far enough away from the other aircraft so that it doesn't have to change its course, velocity, altitude, or engaged procedure in order to avoid a collision with the drone. Which can still mean "too close". I tell them to use the cloud avoidance numbers, such as 2000 feet laterally as a minimum because the closure rate of a drone going 20mph, and an aircraft even doing 70 KIAS on climb out means you have about 4 seconds to realize the problem and get out of the way. If you're lucky.
 

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